​​​WELCOME TO
ST. MATTHEW PARISH! 

Go therefore and make disciples of all
Mass Times
 

Weekday Masses:
Monday - Friday: 8:00 am

(Church will be open until 1:00pm for Personal Prayer)

Weekend Masses:

Saturday Vigil: 5:00 pm

Sunday Masses:
8:00 am • 10:00 am • 12:00 pm

Eucharistic Adoration

Thursdays after morning Mass until 6:30pm

Confessions

Thursdays: 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm

St. Matthew Parish is participating in
Word on Fire Engage from Bishop Barron. 

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Bible in a Year

The Bible in A Year - Get Started January 1, 2022

Make your resolution now! Start your year off by diving into Scripture. By the end of 2022, you could make your way through the whole Bible. A popular option, which will also be available in Spanish, is Ascension's Bible in a Year Podcast hosted by Fr. Mike Schmitz and featuring Jeff Cavins.

They guide guests through the Bible in 365 episodes, starting January 1st. 

Each 20-25 minute episode includes: 

  • two to three scripture readings 

  • a reflection from Fr. Mike Schmitz

  • and guided prayer to help you hear God’s voice in his Word.
     

Unlike any other Bible podcasts, Ascension’s Bible in a Year Podcast for Catholics follows a reading plan inspired by the Great Adventure Bible Timeline®  learning system, a groundbreaking approach to understanding Salvation History developed by renowned Catholic Bible teacher Jeff Cavins. To explore ways to engage visit their website.

Synod for a Synodal Church

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Pope Francis has called for a Synod of the whole Church - a way for us to listen to one another and to the Holy Spirit to guide us forward in this time of great division. Pope Francis has said that “the purpose of this Synod, is not to produce documents, but to plant dreams, draw forth prophecies and visions, allow hope to flourish, inspire trust, bind up wounds, weave together relationships, awaken a dawn of hope, learn from one another and create a bright resourcefulness that will enlighten minds, warm hearts, give strength to our hands.” (Preparatory Document, #32). The Archdiocese has pulled together many resources including the Pope's homilies, a prayer for the Synod, USCCB recommendations for dioceses, the preparatory document and so much more.  Explore. Find out more about this way in which we will journey together as a Church. Click here to learn more and to share your thoughts. And keep listening to ways to engage in the years ahead!

Whether you are just beginning your stewardship journey or have been living a stewardship way of life for years, today’s readings invite us to ask ourselves two potentially life-changing questions.

The first question is this: “What do you treasure?” Of course, we all know the “right” answer to this question: we treasure our faith, our family, and our friendships. But Jesus tells us in the Gospel passage from Luke how we can discover the real answer to this question. He says, “For where your treasure is, there also will your heart be.”

To bring to light what we truly treasure in life, we can each ask ourselves, “Where do I spend the majority of my energy? Where do I find my thoughts dwelling? How do I choose to spend my time when I find myself with a few spare moments? What do my spending habits reveal about my what is important to me?

As Christian stewards, we are called to live our lives in grateful response to all that God has given us. Do I recognize and treasure these gifts?

The second question today’s readings ask is this: “What would you do if you were not afraid?” To put it another way, “What would you do if you had radical faith in God?” The second reading from the letter to the Hebrews defines faith as “the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen.”

This passage inspires us with the faith shown by Abraham. “By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance. By faith he sojourned in the promised land… By faith he received power to generate, even though he was past the normal age.”

Abraham was a senior citizen when he received the seemingly crazy invitation from God to take his entire household and head out to an unknown destination. He was an elderly man with an elderly wife and no heirs when God promised to give him countless descendants. Putting his faith in God, Abraham rose above all the fears and doubts he may have had and set out, following God’s call to him “for he thought that the one who had made the promise was trustworthy.”

In the Gospel, Jesus tells us plainly, “Do not be afraid any longer, little flock, for your Father is pleased to give you the kingdom.” If our perfect Father is pleased to offer us nothing less than His Son right now, and Heaven eventually, then what on earth have we to be afraid of?

So, what would our lives look like if we lived unafraid? If we had the kind of radical faith that Abraham showed in ancient days. What ministry might I take on? Or, what projects might I pass up at work so that I can be more present at home? What is the risk God is asking me to take as an act of faith in Him and gratitude for all He has given me?

Later in this Gospel passage Jesus challenges us with these words. “Much will be required of the person entrusted with much, and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more.”

There is so much to think about this week. Let’s ask ourselves what we really treasure, and then take a bold risk — faith-filled and unafraid — to show our gratitude to God for all that He has given to us.

To bring to light what we truly treasure in life, we can each ask ourselves, “Where do I spend the majority of my energy? Where do I find my thoughts dwelling? How do I choose to spend my time when I find myself with a few spare moments? What do my spending habits reveal about my what is important to me?

As Christian stewards, we are called to live our lives in grateful response to all that God has given us. Do I recognize and treasure these gifts?

The second question today’s readings ask is this: “What would you do if you were not afraid?” To put it another way, “What would you do if you had radical faith in God?” The second reading from the letter to the Hebrews defines faith as “the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen.”

This passage inspires us with the faith shown by Abraham. “By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance. By faith he sojourned in the promised land… By faith he received power to generate, even though he was past the normal age.”

Abraham was a senior citizen when he received the seemingly crazy invitation from God to take his entire household and head out to an unknown destination. He was an elderly man with an elderly wife and no heirs when God promised to give him countless descendants. Putting his faith in God, Abraham rose above all the fears and doubts he may have had and set out, following God’s call to him “for he thought that the one who had made the promise was trustworthy.”

In the Gospel, Jesus tells us plainly, “Do not be afraid any longer, little flock, for your Father is pleased to give you the kingdom.” If our perfect Father is pleased to offer us nothing less than His Son right now, and Heaven eventually, then what on earth have we to be afraid of?

So, what would our lives look like if we lived unafraid? If we had the kind of radical faith that Abraham showed in ancient days. What ministry might I take on? Or, what projects might I pass up at work so that I can be more present at home? What is the risk God is asking me to take as an act of faith in Him and gratitude for all He has given me?

Later in this Gospel passage Jesus challenges us with these words. “Much will be required of the person entrusted with much, and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more.”

There is so much to think about this week. Let’s ask ourselves what we really treasure, and then take a bold risk — faith-filled and unafraid — to show our gratitude to God for all that He has given to us.